Energizing America by State

A snapshot of each state's energy profile. 

Alabama - The United States is the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas. It has made the U.S. more energy secure, added jobs, lifted the economy and lowered energy costs for American households. The increased use of natural gas – illustrated in Alabama – is the chief reason the U.S. leads the world in reducing energy-related carbon emissions. All are byproducts of the U.S. energy revolution.
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Alaska - Alaska represents a major part of America’s energy past, present and future. North Slope oil production – accounting for more than 95 percent of Alaska’s overall output – and the Trans-Alaska Pipeline that connects the oil fields with Valdez in the south were and are critically important to our country’s energy security. To ensure America’s future energy security, it’s imperative that Arctic oil and natural gas production in the Chukchi and Beaufort seas off Alaska’s northern coast be included in the United States’ strategic energy planning.
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Arizona - You might not think of Arizona as an energy state and to be sure, it ranks in the 30s in both oil and natural gas production. Arizona’s per capita energy consumption ranks 45th out of the 50 states. Yet, the state’s Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station is the largest nuclear power plant in the country, and the state ranked second in the country in utility-scale electricity generation from solar energy.

But Arizona’s energy ties go deeper. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, fuels from petroleum – natural gas, gasoline, fuel oil and others – supplied about 58 percent of the energy Arizonans used in 2014.
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Arkansas - Among the country’s top 15 states in overall energy production, Arkansas had a more than 400 percent increase in natural gas output from 2005 through 2015 – thanks to safe hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling in shale and other tight-rock formations. By itself Arkansas accounted for 3.5 percent of U.S. gas production. In a real sense, the state is a snapshot of the U.S. energy renaissance, launched by fracking.
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California - California is the country’s third-largest oil producer, delivering more than 201 million barrels of oil in 2015, behind only Texas and North Dakota. At the same time, the state ranks third in oil refining capacity from its 18 operating refineries. Bottom line: California plays a major role in meeting its own energy and fuel needs, as well as those of the West Coast and beyond.
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Colorado - Safe and responsible energy development has made the United States the world leader in oil and natural gas production, with states including Colorado playing a leading role. Pro-development policies are needed to continue America's energy renaissance, which is boosting the economy, making the U.S. more secure in the world and helping to lower emissions.
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Connecticut - Connecticut produces neither crude oil nor natural gas. It relies on intrastate pipelines to deliver natural gas, which is the leading fuel used by state residents and businesses. Sufficient pipeline capacity is the critical energy issue in Connecticut and the rest of New England, and that depends on operators having the opportunity to build new pipelines.
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Delaware - The fact that Delaware has no oil or natural gas production doesn’t diminish the important part the state plays in America’s overall energy sector. Delaware is home to the Delaware City coking refinery, one of two coking refineries on the East Coast. These supply petroleum coke for the electric power and industrial sectors and makes up about a fifth of the nation’s finished petroleum product exports, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration data. In addition to that energy infrastructure, the state’s Delaware River ports and rail network make it critically important to the shipment of crude oil for refining in the state and neighboring states.
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Florida - Florida is a tale of two energy stories. On the consumption side, only Texas generates more net electricity from natural gas than Florida – which makes sense given Florida’s use of electricity to run air conditioners during the summer and home heating units during the winter. Production-wise, Florida is in the second tier of states in output (about 2 million barrels of oil in 2015, compared to Texas’ 1.26 billion barrels) – yet geologists believe there may be large oil and natural gas reserves on the outer continental shelf off Florida’s western coast.
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Georgia - Georgia is another good example of an all-of-the-above energy state. As an energy producer, Georgia has more nuclear electric power than any other energy source. At the same time, natural gas is the state’s leading fuel for generating electricity, accounting for 40.2 percent of its net generation in 2015. As a heavily forested state, Georgia produces large volumes of feedstock for biomass electricity generation, ranking third in net electricity from biomass in 2014. It truly takes an all-of-the-above energy approach – including oil and natural gas, nuclear, renewables – to energize a state and a country.
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Hawaii - Sitting in the middle of the Pacific Ocean and without oil and natural gas resources of its own, Hawaii must import virtually all of the energy it uses – 91 percent of it in 2013, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). The state uses more jet fuel than any other energy source – understandable give its distance from the mainland. Meanwhile, 70 percent of the state's net electricity generation in 2015 was fueled by petroleum liquids.
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Idaho - Idaho illustrates once again the all-of-the-above nature of American energy. The U.S. is the world's leading producer of oil and natural gas, and oil and gas anchor the energy needs of the national economy and state economies. At the same time, other energy sources are important contributors in the daily effort to supply Americans with the power and fuels they need.
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Illinois - In the heart of the U.S. industrial and agricultural belt, Illinois' significant energy contribution is its infrastructure. The state hosts four crude oil refineries with a capacity of more than 962,000 barrels per day, making Illinois the largest refining state in the Midwest, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). The state ranked fourth in the U.S. in refining as of January 2015.
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Indiana - Indiana’s significant industrial sector, which manufactures steel, aluminum, chemicals and more, used more energy (1,327 trillion Btu) than the state’s residential and commercial sectors combined (972.8 trillion Btu) in 2014. The sector is the state’s largest natural gas user, consuming more gas than all other sectors combined, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.
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Iowa - Given the fact Iowa leads the U.S. in corn production (18.4 percent of the national total last year), it follows that the state would also lead the country in biofuel production. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Iowa is the country’s largest ethanol producer, supplying 27.3 percent of U.S. fuel ethanol operating capacity in 2015. Iowa also is a big wind state, ranking second among the 50 states in net electricity generation from wind last year. Yet, at the same time, EIA says fossil fuels supplied more than 70 percent of the energy Iowans used in 2014, further illustrating the all-of-the-above nature of energy at state and local levels.
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Kansas - The varied energy story in Kansas includes oil and natural gas production, refining, critically important pipeline infrastructure and significant contributions from renewables, chiefly wind. In other words, Kansas – while not one of the country's top energy producers – has an integral role in the overall U.S. energy picture.
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Kentucky - As the United States’ third-largest coal-producing state, Kentucky gets about 87 percent of its electricity from coal-fired generation. Yet natural gas use is growing. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, net electricity generation from natural gas has grown more than 460 percent in Kentucky since 2006. Electricity generation is now the state’s second-largest natural gas consuming sector.
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Louisiana - We kicked off our 50 states of energy blog post series on Monday with New Jersey. Over the next several weeks we’ll focus on the impacts of energy in each individual state – underscoring the reality that the United States as an energy superpower, leading the world in oil and natural gas production, is very much a sum of its energy parts. Today: Louisiana.
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Maine - Woods. Maine has lots of woods. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, nearly 90 percent of the state is forested. Hence the nickname: the Pine Tree State. Naturally, wood products factor heavily in Maine’s energy portfolio, with biomass supplying the largest share of the energy Maine uses annually (27.3 percent in 2014).

Yet, Maine is an all-of-the-above energy state – even with all those trees. Fuels from petroleum and natural gas are the next three largest energy sources, accounting for 52.8 percent of Maine’s energy use.
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Maryland - An all-of-the-above energy narrative is playing out in Maryland – as it is in the country at large. The United States is the world's leading producer of oil and natural gas, fuels that are complemented by coal, nuclear, solar, wind and other renewable energy sources. It's an approach that serves the nation well and should be supported by pro-development policies.
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Massachusetts - The key energy issue in Massachusetts, like a number of other New England states, is infrastructure. Massachusetts doesn't produce natural gas and oil itself, so the state must bring these fuels in from elsewhere to heat homes and generate electricity for residences and businesses.
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Michigan - The United States and Michigan use an array of energies – to run economies, to fuel commerce, transportation and daily living. Oil and natural gas lead this portfolio, supplying 65 percent of the energy the U.S. used in 2015 and projected by EIA to supply 67 percent of our energy in 2040 (chart, Page 6). In that context, the ongoing domestic energy renaissance, featuring significant increases in oil and gas production, has been good for U.S. energy security.
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Minnesota - Minnesota produces no oil or natural gas itself, yet important energy infrastructure – a couple of crude oil refineries and a number of pipeline systems make it integral to U.S. energy. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the Pine Bend Refinery (339,000 barrels per day) is the largest refinery located in a non-oil producing state. Much of the crude processed by both refineries comes from Canada, America's largest source of imported oil (1.15 billion barrels in 2015) and critically important to U.S. energy security.
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Mississippi - Oil production in Mississippi is rising after slowly declining from the mid-1980s through 2005. Since 2006, production has climbed 43.5 percent, and the state ranks 14th in the country in oil output, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).
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Missouri - Located in the heart of the country, Missouri is the crossroads for more than two dozen pipelines that deliver crude oil, petroleum products, natural gas and natural gas liquids from producers to markets and, ultimately, consumers. Though the state produced only 150,000 barrels of oil last year, it remains a key component in America's energy mix because of the infrastructure it hosts.
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Montana - Montana is a leading energy producer in an energy nation – one that leads the world in oil and natural gas output. America's ongoing energy renaissance is largely due to private energy investment and development – in the Bakken and other energy-rich fields.
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Nebraska - Nebraska is a state with significant energy potential. While the state's conventional oil and natural gas production has been declining, there's considerable promise seen in the vast Niobrara shale play, an emerging producer in Colorado and Wyoming, which stretches south into the western part of Nebraska.
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Nevada - Natural gas figures prominently in Nevada's energy picture – despite the fact the state has no natural gas production of its own. Nevadans used more natural gas than any other energy source in 2014, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) – 39 percent of the state's total. Natural gas accounted for 73 percent of Nevada's net electricity generation in 2015, EIA says.
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New Mexico - Energy = opportunity – in New Mexico and across the U.S. Indeed, New Mexico is energy-rich, ranking sixth nationally in oil production and eighth in marketed natural gas output in 2015. Oil production has more than doubled since 2009, helped by development of the Permian Basin shale in southeastern New Mexico with hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.
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New Hampshire - New Hampshire is without oil and natural gas reserves of its own. Nuclear accounted for about 47 percent of the state's net electricity generation last year, with natural gas supplying about 30 percent. But since that gas – as well as natural gas for home heating – must come from elsewhere, the state (and the rest of New England for that matter) is engaged in an important conversation over ensuring adequate pipeline capacity to meet home, commercial and industrial needs.
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New Jersey - New Hampshire is without oil and natural gas reserves of its own. Nuclear accounted for about 47 percent of the state's net electricity generation last year, with natural gas supplying about 30 percent. But since that gas – as well as natural gas for home heating – must come from elsewhere, the state (and the rest of New England for that matter) is engaged in an important conversation over ensuring adequate pipeline capacity to meet home, commercial and industrial needs.
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New York - A handful of stats stand out about New York state and energy: First, among the 50 states New York was the fourth-largest consumer of natural gas in 2014, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration data. More than half the state's households heat with natural gas. New York also ranked fourth in the country in the use of natural gas for net generated electricity. The good news is a big part of New York sits atop the prolific Marcellus shale play, which could hold more than 9 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, according to one estimate.
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North Carolina - Keeping offshore energy under wraps hinders U.S. security and blocks states like North Carolina from realizing the job and economic benefits that could come with safe development. North Carolinians recognize the potential benefits for their state as well as the nation, 64 percent of registered state voters saying they support offshore development.
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North Dakota - North Dakota's dramatic production increase is a big reason the United States leads the world in oil and natural gas output. As North Dakota energy production has expanded, so has U.S. output – helping the economy, benefiting individual households and making the country more energy secure. North Dakota is a microcosm of that larger energy picture.
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Ohio - Energy in Ohio – one of the cradles of the oil and natural gas industry – is trending up, to say the least. This is because development of safe fracking technology is unlocking the Utica shale play that underlies much of the eastern part of the state, as well as the westernmost edge of the Marcellus play a layer above the Utica. As a result, Ohio ranked 10th in natural gas production last year, nearly doubling from 2014 to 2015.
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Oklahoma - As the United States’ fifth-ranked state in total energy production, Oklahoma has virtually the entire package: oil and natural gas (both top-five in output nationally), the sprawling oil pipeline and storage hub at Cushing, refineries and renewable energy – found in all that wind that comes sweepin’ down the plain, of course.
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Oregon - Even in a big hydroelectric power-producing state like Oregon, petroleum-based fuels play an important energy role. Hydro accounted for 55.5 percent of the state’s net electricity generation in 2015 and supplied 34 percent of the energy Oregonians used in 2014 – the largest single energy source. Yet, combined fuels from oil and natural gas supplied 54.5 percent of the energy the state used. By itself, natural gas supplied 23 percent of the energy the state consumed.
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Pennsylvania - Sitting atop the prolific Marcellus and Utica shale plays, Pennsylvania is a natural gas production powerhouse – thanks to modern hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that the two plays provided 85 percent of U.S. shale gas production growth since the start of 2012, reflecting the blossoming production from shale and other tight-rock formations through safe fracking.
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Rhode Island - Without any oil or natural gas of its own, Rhode Island ranks 49th among the 50 states in energy production. Thus, virtually all of the energy Rhode Island uses must come from somewhere else. In 2015, 95.2 percent of Rhode Island’s net generation of electricity was fueled by natural gas, which makes sufficient infrastructure – pipelines and gas-fired power plants – an imperative.
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South Carolina - South Carolina is another piece of the national energy equation whose sum is an American energy superpower, leading the world in oil and natural gas production.
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South Dakota - South Dakota ranks in the bottom tier of oil and natural gas-producing states – the fortunes of geology limiting the energy-rich Bakken shale to North Dakota and Montana. Even so, South Dakota makes other important energy contributions.
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Tennessee - Tennessee illustrates the broader need for all types of energy to keep states and the entire country moving. America's energy revolution is being led by surging oil and natural gas production, but nuclear, renewables and other fuels are required as well.
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Texas - One way to look at oil and natural gas production in Texas – it leads the 50 states in both – is that if Texas were its own country it would rank in the top 10 among the nations of the world in oil and gas output. Texas is its own energy giant.
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Utah - Like a number of states, Utah's oil production has seen significant growth recently, doubling over the past decade while tying an all-time high in 2014. The state's marketed natural gas production has grown about 60 percent since 2002. Meanwhile, the state also is home to vast deposits of oil shale – kerogen-rich rock that releases oil when heated – that could be the largest in the world.
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Vermont - Since closure of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Plant in 2014, Vermont depends on outside sources for about 60 percent of the electricity it uses. Like much of the rest of New England, Vermont would benefit by adding natural gas pipeline capacity to address peak demand periods in the winter.
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Virginia - Virginia, like North Carolina to the south, is believed to host sizeable oil and natural gas reserves off its Atlantic Coast. According to federal estimates, the Mid-Atlantic offshore area (also including Maryland and North Carolina) could hold 2.41 billion barrels of oil and more than 24 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. Development of those resources could turn Virginia into an energy powerhouse.
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Washington - Hydroelectric power is the leading energy source for Washington state. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington was the country's leading producer of hydro electricity in 2014, generating 30 percent of the nation's net output.
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West Virginia - Used to be, when you thought of West Virginia and energy, you thought of coal. Indeed, West Virginia remains a big coal producer, ranking No. 2 in the country (behind Wyoming) in 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) statistics. But the U.S. energy renaissance – driven by advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – has the state’s natural gas production skyrocketing, with benefits to the state and the entire country.
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Wisconsin - Wisconsin doesn't produce any oil, it doesn't produce any natural gas. But it produces great sand - lots of it that plays a critical role in America's energy renaissance. Wisconsin is the nation's leading fracking sand producer, supplying 24 million tons of it, accounting for 44 percent of U.S. production, in 2014.
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Wyoming - Wyoming ranks second among the 50 states in overall energy output, producing 9,362 trillion Btu in 2014, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Only Texas produced more energy.
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